Course Catalog

Beakers to Barrels: Innovation Management

Innovation intensive undertakings require a special focus on the larger pockets of uncertainty that may doom the prospects of success. By acquiring the essential know-how of chemical engineering, the research chemist is prepared to analyze his project as a whole and to successfully identify and rank-order the pockets of uncertainty that constitute a threat for his project. In this short overview talk, we address the question of how to identify, measure, monitor, and rationally tackle, reduce and eventually eliminate these pockets. We equate uncertainly with risk and with innovation work-load. We describe how to use cost uncertainty as a metric for risk, on one hand, and as a means to quantify innovation work-load on the other hand. We outline the latest protocols for a success innovation project – so fundamentally different from a minimum-innovation project – however expensive, however durable. We run through the “Try Again” Network, which offers an innovation map to capture, describe, and prosecute the innovation challenges ahead.

The underlying message is that the chemist cannot walk away when the bench-top process is fully specified. She needs to educate herself with the techniques described herein.

This lecture is given by Gideon Samid, an engineering professor specializing in chemical innovation management. He manages D&G Sciences – Innovation Productivity Corporation, and advises investors, developers, and chemists on how to capture raw creativity and transform it into a useful solution to a tall challenge. Listen to a preview of this lecture.

Course Details

Key Topics

  • identifying uncertainty
  • quantifying risk
  • mapping out innovation projects

Information

Innovation intensive undertakings require a special focus on the larger pockets of uncertainty that may doom the prospects of success. By acquiring the essential know-how of chemical engineering, the research chemist is prepared to analyze his project as a whole and to successfully identify and rank-order the pockets of uncertainty that constitute a threat for his project. In this short overview talk, we address the question of how to identify, measure, monitor, and rationally tackle, reduce and eventually eliminate these pockets. We equate uncertainly with risk and with innovation work-load. We describe how to use cost uncertainty as a metric for risk, on one hand, and as a means to quantify innovation work-load on the other hand. We outline the latest protocols for a success innovation project – so fundamentally different from a minimum-innovation project – however expensive, however durable. We run through the “Try Again” Network, which offers an innovation map to capture, describe, and prosecute the innovation challenges ahead.

The underlying message is that the chemist cannot walk away when the bench-top process is fully specified. She needs to educate herself with the techniques described herein.

This lecture is given by Gideon Samid, an engineering professor specializing in chemical innovation management. He manages D&G Sciences – Innovation Productivity Corporation, and advises investors, developers, and chemists on how to capture raw creativity and transform it into a useful solution to a tall challenge.

This overview lecture is 40 minutes long and is accompanied by lecture slides. Listen to a preview of this lecture.

Who Should Attend

Research and development chemists, seeking to improve their skills in moving their innovative chemical ideas into industrial reality.

Course Locations

Date

TBA

This lecture is provided in downloadable MP3 format, and can be listened to in the car, from your smartphone, on any mp3 player, etc.

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Venue

On Demand

You will receive access to the audio lecture along with accompanying materials within 1 business day of your registration.


Pricing
Standard $199

About the Instructor

  • Gideon Samid

    is a chemical and a nuclear engineer with broad experience (NASA, Exxon, DoD) specializing in the bench-to-production process, estimating the effort to achieve an R&D objective, and mathematical engineering applications. Dr. Samid earned his degrees at the Technion — Israel Institute of Technology, holds some patents, and published a critically acclaimed book: “Computer Organized Cost Engineering.”