Course Catalog

Beyond the Bench-Top - Move Your Innovative Chemistry Into Industrial Realization

The objective of industrial realization should guide your chemistry research as well as the subsequent chemical engineering development. This guidance follows cost and economic considerations, and requires good engineering insight, as well as literacy of the modern tools for innovation productivity management.  Invest two well focused days to upgrade your aptitude for the challenge of turning your brainchild into a useful, industrial size production. It’s a shame to let your ideas rot in your drawer, or let them fall victim to the disconnect between you and the engineers and other non-chemists that you need to interact with

Course Details

Key Topics

  • The more Innovative your chemistry — the higher the overestimate of its industrialization cost: Learn what you can do about it!
  • What scales-up linearly, and what not?  How to avoid the trap of oversimplified up-scaling.
  • Where do you start the engineering — with the reactor, with the separator, with the drums, or with the pumps?
  • The give and take of computerized process controls, and when is classic control good enough?
  • How to wrestle with transport phenomena (heat, mass and momentum transfer) without getting lost in those partial differential equations
  • Unlike most chemists — learn not to ignore the complexity of  industrial mixing, and the impact of viscosity on uniformity.

Information

The objective of industrial realization should guide your chemistry research as well as the subsequent chemical engineering development. This guidance follows cost and economic considerations, and requires good engineering insight, as well as literacy of the modern tools for innovation productivity management.  Invest two well focused days to upgrade your aptitude for the challenge of turning your brainchild into a useful, industrial size production. It’s a shame to let your ideas rot in your drawer, or let them fall victim to the disconnect between you and the engineers and other non-chemists that you need to interact with

Who Should Attend

Research chemists busy with bench-top innovation concerned about moving their brain child into industrial realization. The next step is to negotiate with the chemical engineer, and to convince the financial analyst.  Learn where they are coming from, how they do their job, and how to present your chemistry to them so as to diminish the prospects for ending up with chemistry-complete folder, collecting dust in your desk drawer.

Benefits

Going home you will be in command of the principles and major tools for focusing your own work on what is critical for realizing your chemistry innovation. You will have a good sense, and practical insight of the engineering activity that follows your chemistry; you will be mindful of the point of view, interests, and disposition of the chemical engineers and all other non-chemists you need to successfully interact with to make a go out of your idea. In short, these two days will seriously upgrade your winning prospects.

Agenda

  • Introduction and Overview:
    • The typical mistakes innovative chemists make that keep their innovation unrealized
    • What must happen beyond your bench-top chemistry for your idea to run the distance?
    • Who are the people whom you need to interact with, to move forward; what is their angle, and how to handle them.
    • What typically goes wrong with highly innovative chemical ideas on their way to the market?
    • What are the most critical engineering insights a chemist should be aware of?
    • What are the most critical cost and economics insights a chemist should be aware of?
    • Appraisal and rational handling of uncertainty, risk and opportunity.
    • How to build an Innovation Roadmap.
    • Lessons learned from real case studies.
  • Chemical Engineering Essentials
    • Reactor Design
    • Separation of Materials
    • Transport Phenomena (heat, mass, momentum)
    • Engineering Thermodynamics
    • Scale-Up
    • Process Control
    • Architecture of Chemical Plants
    • Cost Estimation
    • Engineering Design Practice
    • Project Management
  • Innovation Productivity Tools
    • The essentials of managing innovation-intensive projects — how different from nominal project management.
    • How to Appraise the required Innovation workload?
    • How to Appraise Innovation Progress?
    • How to Reconcile Innovation Momentum and Creative Spontaneity with preset schedule and agreed-upon work-plan?
    • How to solve an intractable  Innovation Challenge by identifying a related challenge that will mitigate the intractable one?
    • How to break Innovation Challenges into negotiable components?
    • How to identify seemingly unrelated innovative cases that provide insight into the challenge at hand?
    • How to abstract a given challenge so it can be presented to a larger circle of experts?
    • Modern innovation methods:  large-team coordinated innovation, open innovation, crowdsourced innovation.
    • How to present chemical innovation to chemical engineers, and business executives?

Course Locations

Date

TBA

Check-in opens at 7:30 a.m. on the first day of the course.

Course runs from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. each day.

Register Via Mail

Venue


Pricing
  Member Non-Member
Advanced $1,495 $1,695
Standard $1,895 $2,095

The course fee includes a course binder and a continental breakfast each day.

Five for Four! Register five people for one course, one person for five courses, or any combination in between and your fifth registration is free. Note: This discount is only available if you register by fax or mail and mention this discount. May not be combined with any other offer.

About the Instructor

  • Gideon Samid

    is a chemical and a nuclear engineer with broad experience (NASA, Exxon, DoD) specializing in the bench-to-production process, estimating the effort to achieve an R&D objective, and mathematical engineering applications. Dr. Samid earned his degrees at the Technion — Israel Institute of Technology, holds some patents, and published a critically acclaimed book: “Computer Organized Cost Engineering.”