Course Catalog

Generation and Interpretation of Tandem Mass Spectra

This is a frontier-level course covering fundamentals and modern aspects of tandem mass spectrometry. The main emphasis of the course is on structure elucidation of small molecules and large biological molecules by interpretation of their tandem mass spectra.

Course Details

Key Topics

  • Generating gaseous ions and separating them according to mass to charge ratios
  • Instrumentation for tandem mass spectrometry (ion traps, triple quadrupole mass analyzers, hybrid instruments, Time-of-Flight instruments, Double-focusing mass spectrometers)
  • Isolating gaseous ions of interest
  • Fragmenting an isolated ion by ion activation
  • Comparing strengths and limitations of different tandem mass spectrometric techniques
  • Interpreting tandem mass spectrometric product ion spectra of positive and negative ions
  • Obtaining quantitative data from your sample by tandem mass spectrometry
  • Deciding the best techniques for your sample analysis
  • Dealing with how to buy a tandem mass spectrometer suitable for solving your analytical problems
  • Details about facts your vendor might not tell you

Information

This is a frontier-level course covering fundamentals and modern aspects of tandem mass spectrometry. The main emphasis of the course is on structure elucidation of small molecules and large biological molecules by interpretation of their tandem mass spectra.

Who Should Attend

Researchers, technicians and others requiring frontier-level knowledge and skills of both qualitative and quantitative sample analysis by tandem mass spectrometry. The course is intended for practicing mass spectrometrists who wish learn latest developments in the field. A basic knowledge of organic and physical chemistry is required. The course is recommended especially to those who have already attended the instructors Introduction to Modern Mass Spectrometry course.

Benefits

  • Consult with a leading scientist about your tandem mass spectrometric needs and problems
  • Find out benefits and limitations of tandem mass spectrometry
  • Learn strategic analytical procedures followed by fellow mass spectrometrists
  • Start talking the professional jargon mass spectrometrists speak
  • Improve the way you approach solving an analytical problem by tandem mass spectrometry
  • Learn about hyphenating chromatographic procedures with a tandem mass spectrometer

Agenda

  • Basic Concepts of Tandem Mass Spectrometry
  • Instrumentation for Tandem Mass Spectrometry (tandem in space and time techniques)
  • Isolation and fragmentation of gaseous ions (CID, SORI, IRMPD, BIRD, ECD, ETD. Post-source decay (PSD), and linked scans techniques
  • Operational modes for tandem Mass Spectrometry (first quad scan, product (daughter) ion scan, precursor (parent) ion scan, constant neutral loss scan, constant neutral gain scan, MRM)
  • Ion mobility separation of gaseous ions
  • Fragmentation mechanisms of even-electron positive and negative ions
  • MS/MS of amino acids, peptides, carbohydrates, lipids, and small organic molecules
  • Interfacing chromatographs with tandem mass spectrometers
  • Quantification (SIM, MRM) of Biological, Pharmacological, and Forensic samples

Course Locations

Date

TBA

Check-in opens at 7:30 a.m. on the first day of the course.

Course runs from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. each day.

Register Via Mail

Venue

The course fee includes a course binder and a continental breakfast each day.

Five for Four! Register five people for one course, one person for five courses, or any combination in between and your fifth registration is free. Note: This discount is only available if you register by fax, mail or phone and mention this discount and may not be combined with any other offer.


Pricing
Early $1,395
Advanced $1,495
Standard $1,595

About the Instructor

  • Athula Attygalle

    is a faculty member in the Department of Chemistry, Chemical Biology and Biomedical Engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey. He joined Stevens in 2001, after serving ten years as the Director of the mass spectrometry facility of Cornell University.