Course Catalog

Practical Approaches to Patents and Other Forms of Intellectual Property

Have you ever discovered a new composition of matter for a polymer or synthesized a drug by a novel chemical process? What is the next step to protect your invention for your employer or yourself? What invention documentation must you perform and what information do you need to assemble to complete an Invention Disclosure? When talking to a patent attorney, do you understand the language of Patent Law so that the personal interaction is productive?

After your invention, you need to determine from a Prior Art search of the public domain information, if your invention is new or novel. All through this inventive process, you may want to keep the new information as a trade secret. Or should you file a provisional patent or a non-provisional patent application? What are the advantages and disadvantages? Eventually your successfully launched product from your invention may need a trademark. Then later, you want to publish a scientific article but what should you know about copyrights? If you have very little intellectual property training, then sign up for this course.

Course Details

Key Topics

  • Participants will leave the course with a working knowledge of the 4 cornerstones of intellectual property: patents, trade secrets, copyrights, and trademarks.
  • Students will learn how to construct a Prior Art search.
  • Participants will learn how to develop a spreadsheet from the findings of the Prior Art search and how this will help to determine the novel elements of your invention
  • Students will be able to write a draft of a patent application for your attorney
  • Participants will learn about how the USPTO works and what rejections patent examiners use against your patent application
  • Students will complete exercises based on specifically issued patents discussed in class
  • Participants will learn the 6 basic requirements for patentability
  • Students will see the importance of reviewing a File Wrapper and how to conduct a Freedom to Operate on your patent claims against other competitors claims upon which you may infringe.

Information

Have you ever discovered a new composition of matter for a polymer or synthesized a drug by a novel chemical process? What is the next step to protect your invention for your employer or yourself? What invention documentation must you perform and what information do you need to assemble to complete an Invention Disclosure? When talking to a patent attorney, do you understand the language of Patent Law so that the personal interaction is productive?

After your invention, you need to determine from a Prior Art search of the public domain information, if your invention is new or novel. All through this inventive process, you may want to keep the new information as a trade secret. Or should you file a provisional patent or a non-provisional patent application? What are the advantages and disadvantages? Eventually your successfully launched product from your invention may need a trademark. Then later, you want to publish a scientific article but what should you know about copyrights? If you have very little intellectual property training, then sign up for this course.

Suggested Reading – Writing Chemistry Patents and Intellectual Property: A Practical Guide by Francis J. Waller (Hardcover – Sep 21, 2011)

Who Should Attend

People with science training and are involved with inventing, writing and developing lecture material, and innovate by manufacturing products. These activities will require knowledge of patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets.

The only prerequisite is one year of organic chemistry.

Benefits

  • You will develop a language so you can talk with your intellectual property attorneys in particular your patent attorney.
  • Being able to write your own patent application drafts will save your employer external patent attorney fees and internal patent attorney time.
  • By understanding intellectual property, you will be able to keep abreast of your competitors R&D direction by reading their patent estates.

Agenda

  • Introduction –Forms of intellectual property; regular and provisional patent applications, novelty and obviousness; company and university patent estate trends.
  • Public Domain Information –Global scientific information trends; monitoring global information.
  • Patents –Defining the invention; how to write a patent draft; claim structure; preventing USPTO action rejections.
  • Competitive Patent Landscape –Validity of patent claims; infringement; file histories; freedom to operate; intellectual property coordination team.
  • Other Information Available from Notes –Non-Disclosure (Confidentiality) agreements; licensing; business plan connection; foreign filing; utility patents and what is patentable.

Course Locations

Date

TBA

Check-in opens at 7:30 a.m. on the first day of the course.

Course runs from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. each day.

Register Online Register Via Mail

Venue

The course fee includes a course binder and a continental breakfast.


Pricing
  Member Non-Member
Early $795 (ends December 31, 2012) $795 )ends December 31, 2012)
Advanced $895 (ends August 6, 2013) $1,095 (ends August 6, 2013)
Standard $1,095 $1,295

Five for Four! Register five people for one course, one person for five courses, or any combination in between and your fifth registration is free. Note: This discount is only available if you register by fax or mail and mention this discount. May not be combined with any other offer.

About the Instructor

  • Fran Waller

    is a recently retired Senior Research Associate from Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. with more than 34 years of experience in industry and teaching. He holds 45 U.S. and 23 foreign patents. In addition, Dr. Waller has published 70 scientific articles.